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'We want them to be safe': Child Safety Link shares tips on summer helmet safety

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Our partners at Child Safety Link say helmets are an essential part of summer fun.

“We do want to encourage children to be outside participating and cycling or scootering, whatever they are interested in, but we want them to be safe,” said Samantha Noseworthy of Child Safety Link in an interview with CTV's Crystal Garrett on Tuesday.

In Nova Scotia, people are required by law to wear a helmet no matter their age for their own safety said Noseworthy.

“We know that a well fitting helmet can reduce the seriousness of head injury by 60 per cent, so a very significant impact if you have the proper helmet on,” she says.

Noseworthy said it is important to make sure you use the correct helmet for the activity.

“The important thing about a cycling helmet that makes it a bit different is that they are single impact. That means if your child falls and hits their head or if they drop their helmet on the concreate, you need to replace the helmet even if the outside doesn’t look damaged,” she said.

“A multi sport helmet is safe to use cycling, but also if you have a child who likes to skateboard, scooter, and rollerblade. The difference is that its multi impact. So you can fall and hit your head or drop the helmet multiple times and it continues to be safe to use,” she adds.

When buying helmets second hand, Noseworthy said it is important to make sure you know the history of the helmet.

“You really don’t want to purchase a second hand helmet, unless you know the history of that helmet. The form in the helmet can become compacted when you have an impact and that reduces the quality of the helmet,” she said.

Noseworthy said to use the ‘2V1’ rule to make sure the helmet fits properly on the head.

“What we want is two fingers width between the bottom of the helmet and your eyebrow. The ‘V’ is going to be where the strap comes around your ear and it should make a ‘V’ shape and join at the bottom of your ear lobe. You should be only able to fit one finger between your chin and the strap,” she said.

It is also important to make sure the helmet is sitting securely on the head.

“We don’t like to see hats underneath helmets. That can really affect fit. If your child has ponytail, make sure the ponytail is low, below the bottom of the helmet so it doesn’t affect the way the helmet sits on your head,” said Noseworthy.

Noseworthy said always remember to check the owner’s manual when you purchase a helmet, as it will show what activities the helmet is approved for.

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