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Halifax doughnut shop expands to Dartmouth

Vandal Doughnuts is opening a new store in Dartmouth. (Source: Vandal Doughnuts) Vandal Doughnuts is opening a new store in Dartmouth. (Source: Vandal Doughnuts)
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Nova Scotians looking to satisfy their sweet tooth this holiday season will have a chance to indulge in some tasty confections thanks to a new store in Dartmouth.

Vandal Doughnuts, which already has a storefront on Gottingen Street in Halifax, is expanding to Dartmouth in December, opening a new location on Portland Street.

“It’s the perfect spot being on Portland Street,” said Zoe Boosey, owner of Vandal Doughnuts. “The area is perfect for me.”

Boosey bought the assets of Vandal Doughnuts earlier this year and merged it with Fortune Doughnuts, which was also up for sale, creating one unified brand.

“When I bought Vandal, I wanted to grow it,” Boosey said. “When we opened Vandal, we had a lot of people asking for a spot in Dartmouth.”

Boosey said the new store on Portland Street will occupy the former home of Sprout Therapy, a juice bar and smoothie shop.

“The person at Sprout Therapy is a friend of mine,” Boosey said. “They’re expanding their business and they said it was a great spot for me.”

Beyond Dartmouth, Boosey is planning to open another Vandal Doughnuts spot on the Halifax waterfront next summer. As for the Dartmouth spot, Boosey hopes to have it open sometime in mid-December and they’ll kick if off with some sort of launch.

When it comes to picking a favourite doughnut, Boosey finds it difficult to narrow her options down to just one.

“It’s really hard to pick one doughnut,” Boosey said. “I love the lemon meringue. We’re about to launch a Bailey’s doughnut for Christmas.”

For more Nova Scotia news visit our dedicated provincial page.

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