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N.S. government spends $350,000 in funding on first of its kind simulator for NSCC

A photo of the fishing simulator coming to the NSCC Shelburne Campus. (Courtesy: N.S. Government) A photo of the fishing simulator coming to the NSCC Shelburne Campus. (Courtesy: N.S. Government)
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The Nova Scotia government is funding a new fisheries simulator for the NSCC Shelburne Campus which will allow students to practise operating fishing vessels while on land.

The simulator features navigation systems for both fishing and aquaculture, making it the first of its kind in Canada.

The grant comes from the province’s Department of Advanced Education, which is spending $350,000 on the project.

The province says they hope the project will help bring more participation to operations and careers involving fishing vessels, as well as help the fishing sector by bringing in a more highly skilled and experienced workforce.

“As Nova Scotians, we are proud of our connection to the ocean as a way of life and livelihood, and we are pleased to be the first in Canada to adopt this new fisheries technology,” said Shelburne MLA Nolan Young in the announcement Friday.

“We look forward to welcoming future entrants and industry partners to learn and train in this safe, simulated environment.”

Currently there are more than 3,900 registered fishing vessels in Nova Scotia, with more than 6,000 people holding licenses for commercial fishing. While NSCC’s school of fisheries attracts around 1,500 students a year, the province says it would need to hire around 19,000 new workers in the industry in Canada within the next 10 years in order to keep up, and they hope the simulator will help with that.

“We’re so pleased with the enthusiastic support from the community and invaluable funding from government. This new simulator will make the college a leader in fishery and marine innovation and will ensure we have a means to provide students with a realistic experience of operating a fishing vessel in a safe, simulated environment,” said NSCC president, Don Bureaux.

The first phase of the project is already underway, with NSCC buying 12 laptops and hardware for the simulator. The province says the equipment will be installed and ready to use by the fall.

For more Nova Scotia news visit our dedicated provincial page.

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