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New survey asks for public opinions on current state of policing in Nova Scotia

The RCMP logo is seen outside Royal Canadian Mounted Police "E" Division Headquarters, in Surrey, B.C., on Friday April 13, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck The RCMP logo is seen outside Royal Canadian Mounted Police "E" Division Headquarters, in Surrey, B.C., on Friday April 13, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
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The Nova Scotia government has released an anonymous survey for people to share their opinions of the current state of policing in the province, as well as their ideas for what policing should look like in the future.

The survey, which was launched by the Department of Justice, is part of the province’s comprehensive review of policing services and will be taking submissions until July 31.

“Nova Scotians deserve to have their say about how this important service is delivered in our communities,” said Attorney General and Justice Minister Barbara Adams in a news release Tuesday. “I hope as many people as possible take a moment to share their experiences and ideas with us so we can create a law enforcement system that is responsive and meets the needs of the people it serves.”

While the survey is found online on the province’s website, government says there will also be in-person opportunities as well, adding that will be later in the summer and into the fall.

Lindell Smith, co-chair of the Nova Scotia Policing Review Engagement Advisory Committee, says the survey will help in making sure policing services are up to people’s expectations.

“The voices of Nova Scotians are essential to this review. Participating in this survey gives the public the opportunity to have a direct impact on the way policing services are delivered across our province. It will help ensure that our policing services are aligned with the expectations and needs of the people they serve.”

The in-person sessions will be informed by an advisory committee which includes representatives from government and law enforcement, as well as non-profit organizations and Indigenous, African Nova Scotian, and newcomer communities.

The review is set to be complete by the spring of 2025.

For more Nova Scotia news visit our dedicated provincial page.

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