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'You taste the cover': Compostable Tim Hortons lids get mixed reviews from Islanders

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Maritimers take their Timmie’s very seriously and a change to a cup lid has brewed up plenty of controversy.

Many people can’t start the day without a double double, but some on Prince Edward Island say that morning ritual has started to taste a little bit like cardboard.

“You taste the cover,” said Lisa Lafferty. “I don’t like it.”

Tim Hortons is testing new plastic-free, fibre coffee lids on P.E.I. The cups started rolling out last week and now pretty much every Tim’s on the island is using them.

They’re recyclable when clean and compostable when dirty.

It’s a 12-week pilot project which the company says will help them develop a customer- and environmentally-friendly lid.

The coffee giant said it’s a sustainable way to move forward.

“One thing that we know is that this is a big change for islanders, and it’s a big change in the experience for our guests,” Paul Yang, Tim Hortons sustainability lead.

It hasn’t been without criticism.

“They’re garbage, they’re no good,” said Lafferty, holding her cup. “They need to go back to the original ones.”

This isn’t the first time Tim’s has changed their lids. They replaced the classic lids in 2019 and some diehards still want it back.

“Justin Bieber wants that, and he’s in my campaign,” said Michael Trainor. “I want to go back to the old lids.”

Some have started just taking the lids off or replacing them with the old plastic lids they still have around.

“Tim Hortons lids are no good. They’re garbage. MacDonald’s lids are the way to go,” said Ben Larter. “No more Tim Hortons coffee, unless I’ve got a MacDonald’s cup.”

For some islanders at least, the end of the test can’t come soon enough.

Tim Hortons said they'll take the feedback and refine the design, but they won't know until the trial is over if a national rollout will be the next step or if more testing is needed.

Some people are in favour of the lids, agreeing that a compostable cover is better for the environment.

Tim Hortons said they’re handing out tens of thousands of cups per day. As for the complaints, they say they’re getting about what they expected.

For more Prince Edward Island news visit our dedicated provincial page.

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