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New Brunswick government releases five-year hydrogen 'road map'

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The New Brunswick government has released a five-year "road map" for developing the province’s hydrogen industry.

“It’s a collection of steps the province is going to take, to ensure that a budding sector has an opportunity to take root,” said Mike Holland, minister of natural resources and energy development, on Tuesday.

“It’s the reduction of red tape, the assurance that First Nations are positioned and participate. It’s about ensuring that government departments like post-secondary, education, training and labour and Opportunities New Brunswick are there to assist businesses, to ensure (the) workforce is there.”

Much of the report connects the province’s ongoing development of wind energy and small modular reactors to hydrogen production.

The New Brunswick government’s stated goal is to export hydrogen sometime between 2028 and 2035.

As part of the report, the province plans to develop Port Saint John and Port of Belledune into "hydrogen hubs."

In May, Port of Belledune signed a "green hydrogen" memorandum of understanding with Port of Rotterdam to advance industry ties.

The agreement was signed at the World Hydrogen Summit, where Premier Blaine Higgs also delivered a speech.

In 2022, Irving Oil announced a plan to extend hydrogen capacity at its Saint John refinery.

Holland said the plan will put New Brunswick on good footing within the region, with hydrogen development also ongoing in Newfoundland and Labrador, and Nova Scotia.

For more New Brunswick news visit our dedicated provincial page.

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