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Special weather statements issued in parts of N.S., N.B.

A pedestrian shields themselves from rain and wind in Halifax on Thursday, January 26, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese A pedestrian shields themselves from rain and wind in Halifax on Thursday, January 26, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese
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Environment Canada has issued special weather statements across most of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick ahead of a mid-week storm.

Significant rainfall and strong winds are expected Wednesday morning and will continue until mid-day Thursday.

Nova Scotia

Special weather statements are in effect across mainland Nova Scotia as of Tuesday morning.

The statement says 30-to-50 mm of rainfall is possible, with amounts of 60 mm possible near the Tri-counties in the South Shore.

It also says the frozen ground has a reduced ability to absorb the rainfall.

Maximum southerly wind gusts of 70-to-90 km/h are forecasted. Environment Canada says gusts on exposed coastlines could approach 100 km/h.

“Similar storms in the past have caused travel delays and hazardous driving conditions, and road shoulder erosion and washouts. Significant snowmelt and runoff may occur,” the statement reads.

“Be sure to clear storm drains and gutters of ice and other debris. Localized flooding in low-lying areas is possible. Utility outages are possible.”

New Brunswick

In New Brunswick, 30-to-60 mm of rainfall is expected over central and eastern regions, with 70-to-100 mm over southern parts of the province.

The statement says locally higher amounts are possible, especially along the Fundy Coast.

No warnings are in place in northern regions of the province as of Tuesday morning.

Southerly winds could also gust 70-to-80 km/h, with 100 km/h along the Fundy Coast.

Environment Canada says temperatures are expected to quickly fall below the freezing mark Thursday.

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